MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS

Medicare Advantage has been added to the Medicare program. Medicare Advantage offers people enrolled in Medicare Part A and Part B options for obtaining health services through the Medicare program. It is important to know that you may choose to stay in original Medicare if you are satisfied with that program and that all Medicare Advantage plans must provide at least the same benefits as original Medicare. However, Medicare Advantage plans are not required to provide the same supplemental benefits that are provided under Medicare supplement policies available in Wisconsin. Whether you enroll in original Medicare or Medicare Advantage, you must continue to pay your monthly Medicare Part B premium.

Under Medicare Advantage, the Medicare program will, at your direction, purchase a private health plan on your behalf. Before Medicare will agree to pay for a plan, the plan must meet minimum state and federal requirements for licensure, benefits offered, access to providers, quality of care, and reporting. However, Medicare Advantage plans are annual contracts and are not guaranteed renewable as is required for Medicare supplement policies. As with Medicare supplement policies, the premiums you pay for the Medicare Advantage plan may increase.

 

Eligibility

You can generally join a Medicare Advantage Plan if you meet these conditions:

  • You have Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) and Medicare Part B (medical insurance).
  • You live in the service area of the plan. Contact the plan you're interested in to find out about its service area.
  • You don't have End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant).

All health plan choices may not be available in your area.

 

 

Medicare Advantage - Questions and Answers

 

Costs

You generally still pay the Part B monthly premium. This is the premium that is withheld from your monthly Social Security check. You also pay the Medicare Advantage Plan's premium (if they charge one) that includes coverage for Part A and Part B benefits, prescription drug coverage (Part D, if offered), and any other extra benefits (if offered).

You usually will have to pay some other costs (such as copayments, deductibles, or coinsurance) for the services you get. Out-of-pocket costs in these plans vary by the services you get. Check with your plan before you get a service to find out what your costs may be.

 

What if I have a problem with my Medicare Advantage plan?

Medicare Advantage is an option under the Medicare program. If you have a complaint regarding enrollment, disenrollment, coverage, or a claim, you must follow Medicare rules for resolving the problem. You should first contact the plan regarding your problem. If you are not able to resolve your problem with the plan, you should contact Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227).

State insurance departments, such as the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance (OCI), do not have jurisdiction over the Medicare program or Medicare Advantage plans. However, if your problem involves the acts of a licensed insurance agent, you should file a complaint with the OCI.

What happens if I am unhappy with my Medicare Advantage plan's claim decision?

A Medicare Advantage plan decision regarding the type of service and the amount to reimburse for the service is known as an organization determination. Medicare Advantage plans are required to respond in a timely manner to appeals of organization determinations. Medicare Advantage plans are also required to provide you with written information on how to file an appeal.

  • If you are unhappy with an organization determination, you must first file a request for reconsideration with the Medicare Advantage plan. The plan must issue its decision on your request within 60 calendar days and must issue an expedited decision within 72 hours.
  • If you are still unhappy with the decision, you may then appeal to an independent reviewer. The time frames are the same as those described above.
  • Additional reviews are conducted by an administrative law judge and also by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's appeals counsel. Finally, you may appeal the decision in federal court.
  • If the organization determination affects coverage of a continuing inpatient hospital stay, it may be immediately appealed to a Medicare peer review organization. You are not responsible for any costs incurred while this decision is pending.

If you are unhappy with a plan decision to not expedite an appeal or with the way you have been treated by plan providers, you should file a grievance with your Medicare Advantage plan. Grievances are separate and different from appeals. The plan is required to explain its grievance process to you and to respond to your grievance in a timely fashion.

Can my Medicare Advantage plan drop me?

Medicare Advantage plans can drop you at the end of the plan year if the plan does not renew its contract with Medicare. A plan that does not renew its contract with Medicare may decide to drop select geographic areas of service, or it may decide to nonrenew the entire plan. A plan may involuntarily disenroll you for failure to pay premiums timely, for causing a disruption in the plan's ability to deliver health care services, or if it cannot meet your medical needs. If you are involuntarily disenrolled, you are automatically returned to coverage under original Medicare at the beginning of the month following your involuntary disenrollment.

If I lose my Medicare Advantage coverage and return to original Medicare, can I get Medicare supplement coverage?

If you are involuntarily disenrolled from Medicare Advantage because the Medicare Advantage plan nonrenews its plan, you have the right to apply for a Medicare supplement policy, as long as you do so within 63 days of notice of the nonrenewal. If you voluntarily disenroll because you decide a Medicare Advantage plan is not right for you, you may have a right to Medicare supplement coverage as long as you have not been covered by a Medicare Advantage plan before and you disenroll from the Medicare Advantage plan within 12 months of your enrollment. This right is limited to the same Medicare supplement in which you were most recently previously enrolled, excluding any outpatient prescription drug coverage. If you do not have a right to get your same Medicare supplement coverage back, you will have to complete the medical questions on an application for Medicare supplement and the insurance company can deny your application.

How can I determine if a Medicare Advantage plan is a good choice for me?

Currently, the monthly premiums you will pay for a Medicare Advantage plan are less than the premiums you pay for a Medicare supplement policy. However, Medicare Advantage plans require that you pay a copayment each time you visit your doctor and for physicals, screening, vision and hearing exams, therapy, and rehabilitation services. You may be required to pay a $150 copayment for the 1st through the 5th day of inpatient hospital care and a $50 copayment for emergency room visits. You should compare not only the difference in the monthly premium between a Medicare supplement policy and a Medicare Advantage plan but also the copayment amounts you will pay for Medicare Advantage coverage. Your annual out-of-pocket expenses for a Medicare Advantage plan could range from approximately $500 to $5,900 depending on your health status. (2006 Medicare Advantage Costshare Report, Milwaukee Area Comparisons)

Can I keep my Medicare supplement policy and also have a Medicare Advantage plan?

Your Medicare supplement policy is designed to pay 20% of Medicare approved charges or to "supplement" the benefits payable under original Medicare. If you enroll in Medicare Advantage, you are no longer covered by original Medicare and your Medicare supplement policy will not pay any benefits toward Medicare Advantage out-of-pocket expenses. You should decide whether you want coverage under original Medicare with a Medicare supplement insurance policy or if you want coverage under a Medicare Advantage plan.

Am I entitled to the mandated benefits required by Wisconsin insurance law under Medicare Advantage plans?

Medicare Advantage policies are not subject to the mandated benefit requirements under Wisconsin insurance law. Insurance laws in Wisconsin mandate the coverage of specific services, including diabetic supplies, chiropractic care, limited home health care, and skilled nursing care. You can obtain a copy of the pamphlet, Fact Sheet on Mandated Benefits in Health Insurance Policies, that explains the benefits mandated under Wisconsin insurance law by contacting the OCI.

What happens under Medicare Advantage if I have a medical emergency?

All Medicare Advantage plans are required to use what is known as the "prudent layperson" standard in making coverage decisions about emergency care. Under this standard, if you have acute symptoms, such as severe pain, that would cause a reasonably prudent layperson to expect that delay in treatment would cause serious jeopardy to health or impairment of bodily functions, you are permitted to obtain emergency services without prior approval from your health plan. Emergency services must be provided by a qualified provider and are limited to services needed to diagnose and stabilize your condition. Urgent care is also required to be covered by a Medicare Advantage plan. An urgent care situation would include an accident or sudden illness while you are away from home. If you are a frequent traveler, you should inquire about the plan's guidelines for services when you are out of its geographic service area, including refills on prescription drugs and access to non-urgent or emergency medical services. Your Medicare Advantage plan may have a passport provision allowing you to see providers in other parts of the country. Under a PFFS plan your coverage is not limited by geographic service area. If you need medical attention, you may go to any doctor, specialist, or hospital that is approved for Medicare and accepts the plan's payment terms.

When can I join, switch, or drop my Medicare drug plan?

You can join a Medicare drug plan when you first become eligible for Medicare or if you get Medicare due to a disability. In addition, you are allowed to switch or drop your Medicare prescription plan during the annual election period (November 15 through December 31).

What happens after I join a plan?

You will get a letter from the plan telling you when your coverage begins. Once you enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, you must show your plan ID card every time you visit a health care provider. You cannot use your red, white, and blue Medicare card to get health care because the original Medicare plan will not pay for your health care while you are enrolled in the Medicare Advantage plan. Read plan materials carefully to find out about the rules that can affect where you can get your care and what you will have to pay, including whether the plan has a network (certain providers you must use) and your share of the cost for services and supplies.


Updated: December 28, 2007

fOR QUOTES OR ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE CALL

920-296-4310 OR

TOLL FREE 888-581-4255

 

 

Humana introduces new, flexible individual health insurance plans in Wisconsin

Humana introduces new, flexible individual health insurance plans in Wisconsin

WAUKESHA, WI - May 15, 2007 - Humana Inc. (NYSE: HUM), announced today the introduction of a new portfolio of individual health insurance plans under its HumanaOne brand, designed to make it easy for consumers to select a plan according to their own personal preferences, lifestyles and budgets.  

HumanaOne’s new personal health insurance plan portfolio includes a broad spectrum of benefits – with three in-network coinsurance levels and 17 annual deductible choices – organized into three, consumer-friendly packages:

  • HumanaOne Portrait is for people who are security-minded and want benefits like those provided by big employers.
  • HumanaOne Autograph is for people who want flexibility to fit their financial plan. Three of five Autograph plans are HSA-qualified.
  • monogram from HumanaOne is for the young and invincible at heart who want a low-cost plan with a safety net “just in case.”

The plans can be further personalized with optional benefits such as dental insurance, life insurance, and supplemental accident coverage.

“With the U.S. market for individual health insurance at 18 million and growing, we recognize that personal health insurance plans cannot be ‘one size fits all,’” said Jerry Ganoni, president of HumanaOne, HumanaDental and Humana Small Business. “That’s why we created three separate families of plans, each tailored for a particular kind of health insurance consumer, but at the same time highly customizable. This represents the most significant product expansion for HumanaOne since its inception in 2002.”
 
The new plans from HumanaOne are designed to appeal to consumers seeking very different kinds of individual health insurance plans – from those who desire the security, coverage and service commonly found in health plans from large employers, to those wanting a simple safety net to protect against financial ruin in the event of a major health problem. Within the new portfolio of HumanaOne plans, deductibles range from $1,000 to $7,500 for single coverage and from $2,000 to $15,000 for family coverage. Premiums start as low as $30 per month for single coverage on monogram and extend upward according to the plan, its features and level of benefits.

“This new portfolio of products positions HumanaOne to serve a much larger portion of the individual health insurance market, which we believe will continue to grow at a rate of 5 to 8 percent annually over the next five years,” said Steven DeRaleau, chief operating officer of HumanaOne. “As more people leave group health plans, retire early, become self-employed or work part-time, they will increasingly look to individual health insurance, and HumanaOne will be there to serve them with a plan ideally suited to their distinct needs.”

HumanaOne Portrait, HumanaOne Autograph and monogram from HumanaOne are now available in Colorado, Florida, Kentucky, and Tennessee, and HumanaOne will launch the products in Wisconsin on May 26, 2007. By early 2008, the company plans to have introduced the new product portfolio in all 26 states where HumanaOne currently operates. At present, HumanaOne serves more than 180,000 health plan members.

HumanaOne plans are designed specifically for individuals and families not insured by an employer, such as self-employed entrepreneurs, small business employees, part-time workers, students and early retirees. Humana markets HumanaOne plans through insurance agents and brokers, as well as directly to consumers.

Humana guarantees monthly premium rates on its HumanaOne plans for one full year after purchase, as long as the member remains in the same area and keeps the same benefits. Thanks to Humana’s nationwide network of doctors and hospitals, HumanaOne policyholders who move to a different state can simply take their plan with them, and in most cases, those who work or travel away from home can receive in-network benefits by seeing any of the more than 400,000 Humana-contracted doctors, hospitals and other health care providers across the country.

HumanaOne members have 24-hour access to online tools and resources, enabling them to check claims status, medical expenses, compare hospital, doctor and prescription costs and more.

Graduates Need Health Insurance

Graduates Need Health Insurance

Madison, WI--Graduation carries with it a new set of responsibilities for those entering the "real world" for the first time, not the least of which is the need for health insurance. Unfortunately, in the excitement of graduation, students all too often overlook the fact that they lose their parent's health insurance coverage when they leave school. As a result, the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance (OCI) is encouraging soon-to-be graduates to do some planning now to make sure they have health insurance upon graduation.

"Health insurance is a fundamental building block in the path toward a sound financial future," said Jorge Gomez, Commissioner of Insurance. "Health care in this country can be prohibitively expensive if you don't have insurance, and a basic health plan helps make sure that medical necessities do not cause financial crises."

Graduates are often unfamiliar with health insurance because students in high school and college typically receive coverage as a "dependent" under their parent or guardian's health plan. However, after graduation, most health insurers no longer view former students as dependents and they are dropped from the policy. High schoolers commonly receive dependent status until the age of 19 unless they continue on in school and are classified as a full-time student. College students, meeting the full-time student requirement, are generally viewed as dependents until graduation or age 24.

According to OCI, far too many graduates fail to understand why they need health insurance because they view themselves as "healthy," and insurance plans as an unnecessary cost. Commissioner Gomez says this mindset is dangerous and leaves too much to chance.

"At no time in our lives--even when we're young--are we immune to accident and injury. Things like auto accidents, sports-related injuries and even serious illness can happen at any age. The last thing you want as you are starting out in life is to add the burden of a huge hospital bill on top of your student loans because you got injured and didn't have health insurance. Sadly, that is the risk too many graduates take," Gomez said.

A common period when graduates go without health insurance is between the time they leave school and begin their first job. During this interval, graduates have two primary options for acquiring health insurance: continuation of benefits from their parent's health insurer and individual short-term health insurance policies.

Group Continuation and Conversion Rights

Graduates previously covered under a parent's group health plan may have the right to continue that group coverage for a period of time after they are no longer eligible dependents by paying for the full cost of the coverage themselves. Continuation coverage typically ends when the graduate finds a job and becomes covered under that employer's group health plan.

Graduates may also be eligible to purchase an individual conversion policy when they are terminated from a parent's group health plan. An individual conversion policy can usually be continued as long as the graduate continues to pay the premiums.

Typically graduates have a limited period of time to elect continuation or conversion coverage. OCI recommends graduates contact their parent's employer before or as soon after graduation as possible for further information concerning their continuation and conversion rights.

Short-Term Insurance

Another option students have is to find a short-term health insurance plan. Commonly, short-term plans require enrollees to pay a deductible, after which the insurance pays for a set percentage of the medical expenses. Short-term plans are offered by a variety of insurers and alumni associations. The policies vary in the length of their term, so graduates should be able to find a plan that closely matches the length of time they expect to be between graduation and work.

"A key difference between continuation and short-term plans is that continuation covers preexisting medical conditions whereas short-term plans do not. With a short-term plan, you are essentially buying accident insurance to make sure you have some protection against unforeseen injuries and mishaps," said Gomez.

As with all insurance decisions, OCI encourages consumers to shop around to find the policy that best fits their needs at a price they can afford.

More information about continuation and conversion rights is available in OCI's Fact Sheet on Continuation and Conversion Rights in Health Insurance Policies. The publication is available for download from http://oci.wi.gov, or may be requested by contacting OCI toll-free at 1-800-236-8517, by writing OCI, P.O. Box 7873, Madison, WI 53707-7873, or by e-mailing information@oci.state.wi.us.

Created by the legislature in 1871, Wisconsin's Office of the Commissioner of Insurance (OCI) was vested with broad powers to ensure that the insurance industry responsibly and adequately met the insurance needs of Wisconsin citizens. Today, OCI's mission is to lead the way in informing and protecting the public and responding to its insurance needs.

Helath Savings Accounts "HSA"

 

What is a Health Savings Account (“HSA”)?
A Health Savings Account is an alternative to traditional health insurance; it is a savings product that offers a different way for consumers to pay for their health care. HSAs enable you to pay for current health expenses and save for future qualified medical and retiree health expenses on a tax-free basis.

You must be covered by a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) to be able to take advantage of HSAs. An HDHP generally costs less than what traditional health care coverage costs, so the money that you save on insurance can therefore be put into the Health Savings Account.

You own and you control the money in your HSA. Decisions on how to spend the money are made by  you without relying on a third party or a health insurer. You will also decide what types of investments to make with the money in the account in order to make it grow.

 

What Is a “High Deductible Health Plan” (HDHP)?
You must have an HDHP if you want to open an HSA. Sometimes referred to as a “catastrophic” health insurance plan, an HDHP is an inexpensive health insurance plan that generally doesn’t pay for the first several thousand dollars of health care expenses  (i.e., your “deductible”) but will generally cover you after that .  Of course, your HSA is available to help you pay for the expenses your plan does not cover.

For 2005, in order to qualify to open an HSA, your HDHP minimum deductible must be at least $1,000 (self-only coverage) or $2,000 (family coverage). For 2006, the amounts increase to $1,050 and $2,100, respectively.  The annual out-of-pocket (including deductibles and co-pays) for 2005 cannot exceed $5,100 (self-only coverage) or $10,200 (family coverage).  For 2006, these amounts increase to $5,250 and $10,500, respectively.  HDHPs can have first dollar coverage (no deductible) for preventive care and apply higher out-of-pocket limits (and co pays & coinsurance) for non-network services.

^ TOP

How can I get a Health Savings Account?
Consumers can sign up for HSAs with banks, credit unions, insurance companies and other approved companies. Your employer may also set up a plan for employees as well.

How much does an HSA cost?
An HSA is not something you purchase; it’s a savings account into which you can deposit money on a tax-preferred basis.  The only product you purchase with an HSA is a High Deductible Health Plan, an inexpensive plan that will cover you should your medical expenses exceed the funds you have in your HSA.

 

Health Savings Accounts, Qualified Expenses

The following lists provide a brief summary of the information described in the Internal Revenue can be ordered from the IRS by calling (1-800-829-3676). http://www.irs.gov/

Qualified Medical Expenses Eligible for reimbursement

Abortion
Acupuncture
Air conditioner (when necessary for'
relief from an allergy or for relief from
difficulty in breathing)
Alcoholism treatment
Ambulance
Anesthetists
Artificial limbs
Autoette ( used for relief of sickness)
Birth control pills (by prescription)
Blood tests
Braces
Cardiographs
Chiropractor
Christian Science Practitioner
Contact lenses
Contraceptive devices
Convalescent home (for medical treatment only)
Crutches
Dental treatment
Dental x-rays
Dentures
Dermatologist
Diagnostic fees
Diathermy
Drug addiction therapy
Drugs (prescription)
Eyeglasses
Fees paid to health institute
prescribed by a doctor
FICA and FUTA tax paid for medical
care service
Fluoridation unit
Guide dog
Gynecologist
Healing services
Hearing aid and batteries
Hospital bills
Hydrotherapy
Insulin treatments
Lab tests
Lead paint removal
Legal fees (to authorize treatment )
 Lodging
Metabolism tests
Neurologist

Nursing (including board and meals)
Obstetrician
Operating room costs
Ophthalmologist
Optician
Oral surgery
Organ transplant (including
donor's expenses)
Orthopedic shoes
Orthopedist
Osteopath
Oxygen and oxygen equipment
Pediatrician
Physician
Physiotherapist
Postnatal treatments
Practical nurse for medical
services
Premiums for long-term care insurance
Premiums for continuation coverage
required by Federal law (COBRA)
premiums for insurance received while
receiving unemployment compensation
Prenatal care
Prescription medicines
Psychiatrist
Psychoanalyst
Psychologist
Psychotherapy
Radium therapy
Registered nurse
Special school costs for the handicapped
Spinal fluid test
Splints
Sterilization
Surgeon
Telephone or TV equipment to assist the
hearing impaired
Therapy equipment
Transportation expenses (relative to
health care)
Ultra-violet ray treatment
Vaccines
Vasectomy
Vitamins (if prescribed)
Wheelchair
X-rays

Expenses not eligible for reimbursement

Advance payment for services to
be rendered next year
Athletic club membership
Automobile insurance premium
Allocable to medical coverage
Boarding school fees
Bottled water
Commuting expenses of a disabled
person
Cosmetic surgery and procedures
Cosmetics, hygiene products and
similar items
Diaper service
Domestic help
Funeral, cremation or burial expenses
Health programs offered by resort
Hotels, health clubs and gyms
Illegal operations and treatments
Illegally procured drugs

Maternity clothes
Nonprescription medication
Premiums for life insurance, income
Protection, disability, loss of limbs,
sight or similar benefits
Scientology counseling
Social activities
Special foods or beverages
specially designed car for handicapped
other than autoette or special equipment
Stop smoking programs
Swimming pool
Travel for general health improvement
Tuition and travel expenses for sending a
problem child to a particular school
Weight loss programs

You can also go to this link for more information on HSA’s

http://www.treas.gov/offices/public-affairs/hsa/

OR CALL ME 920-296-4310

TOLL FREE 888-581-4255

 

Helath Savings Accounts "HSA"

 

What is a Health Savings Account (“HSA”)?
A Health Savings Account is an alternative to traditional health insurance; it is a savings product that offers a different way for consumers to pay for their health care. HSAs enable you to pay for current health expenses and save for future qualified medical and retiree health expenses on a tax-free basis.

You must be covered by a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) to be able to take advantage of HSAs. An HDHP generally costs less than what traditional health care coverage costs, so the money that you save on insurance can therefore be put into the Health Savings Account.

You own and you control the money in your HSA. Decisions on how to spend the money are made by  you without relying on a third party or a health insurer. You will also decide what types of investments to make with the money in the account in order to make it grow.

 

What Is a “High Deductible Health Plan” (HDHP)?
You must have an HDHP if you want to open an HSA. Sometimes referred to as a “catastrophic” health insurance plan, an HDHP is an inexpensive health insurance plan that generally doesn’t pay for the first several thousand dollars of health care expenses  (i.e., your “deductible”) but will generally cover you after that .  Of course, your HSA is available to help you pay for the expenses your plan does not cover.

For 2005, in order to qualify to open an HSA, your HDHP minimum deductible must be at least $1,000 (self-only coverage) or $2,000 (family coverage). For 2006, the amounts increase to $1,050 and $2,100, respectively.  The annual out-of-pocket (including deductibles and co-pays) for 2005 cannot exceed $5,100 (self-only coverage) or $10,200 (family coverage).  For 2006, these amounts increase to $5,250 and $10,500, respectively.  HDHPs can have first dollar coverage (no deductible) for preventive care and apply higher out-of-pocket limits (and co pays & coinsurance) for non-network services.

^ TOP

How can I get a Health Savings Account?
Consumers can sign up for HSAs with banks, credit unions, insurance companies and other approved companies. Your employer may also set up a plan for employees as well.

How much does an HSA cost?
An HSA is not something you purchase; it’s a savings account into which you can deposit money on a tax-preferred basis.  The only product you purchase with an HSA is a High Deductible Health Plan, an inexpensive plan that will cover you should your medical expenses exceed the funds you have in your HSA.

 

Health Savings Accounts, Qualified Expenses

The following lists provide a brief summary of the information described in the Internal Revenue can be ordered from the IRS by calling (1-800-829-3676). http://www.irs.gov/

Qualified Medical Expenses Eligible for reimbursement

Abortion
Acupuncture
Air conditioner (when necessary for'
relief from an allergy or for relief from
difficulty in breathing)
Alcoholism treatment
Ambulance
Anesthetists
Artificial limbs
Autoette ( used for relief of sickness)
Birth control pills (by prescription)
Blood tests
Braces
Cardiographs
Chiropractor
Christian Science Practitioner
Contact lenses
Contraceptive devices
Convalescent home (for medical treatment only)
Crutches
Dental treatment
Dental x-rays
Dentures
Dermatologist
Diagnostic fees
Diathermy
Drug addiction therapy
Drugs (prescription)
Eyeglasses
Fees paid to health institute
prescribed by a doctor
FICA and FUTA tax paid for medical
care service
Fluoridation unit
Guide dog
Gynecologist
Healing services
Hearing aid and batteries
Hospital bills
Hydrotherapy
Insulin treatments
Lab tests
Lead paint removal
Legal fees (to authorize treatment )
 Lodging
Metabolism tests
Neurologist

Nursing (including board and meals)
Obstetrician
Operating room costs
Ophthalmologist
Optician
Oral surgery
Organ transplant (including
donor's expenses)
Orthopedic shoes
Orthopedist
Osteopath
Oxygen and oxygen equipment
Pediatrician
Physician
Physiotherapist
Postnatal treatments
Practical nurse for medical
services
Premiums for long-term care insurance
Premiums for continuation coverage
required by Federal law (COBRA)
premiums for insurance received while
receiving unemployment compensation
Prenatal care
Prescription medicines
Psychiatrist
Psychoanalyst
Psychologist
Psychotherapy
Radium therapy
Registered nurse
Special school costs for the handicapped
Spinal fluid test
Splints
Sterilization
Surgeon
Telephone or TV equipment to assist the
hearing impaired
Therapy equipment
Transportation expenses (relative to
health care)
Ultra-violet ray treatment
Vaccines
Vasectomy
Vitamins (if prescribed)
Wheelchair
X-rays

Expenses not eligible for reimbursement

Advance payment for services to
be rendered next year
Athletic club membership
Automobile insurance premium
Allocable to medical coverage
Boarding school fees
Bottled water
Commuting expenses of a disabled
person
Cosmetic surgery and procedures
Cosmetics, hygiene products and
similar items
Diaper service
Domestic help
Funeral, cremation or burial expenses
Health programs offered by resort
Hotels, health clubs and gyms
Illegal operations and treatments
Illegally procured drugs

Maternity clothes
Nonprescription medication
Premiums for life insurance, income
Protection, disability, loss of limbs,
sight or similar benefits
Scientology counseling
Social activities
Special foods or beverages
specially designed car for handicapped
other than autoette or special equipment
Stop smoking programs
Swimming pool
Travel for general health improvement
Tuition and travel expenses for sending a
problem child to a particular school
Weight loss programs

You can also go to this link for more information on HSA’s

http://www.treas.gov/offices/public-affairs/hsa/

OR CALL ME 920-296-4310

TOLL FREE 888-581-4255

 

 
 
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